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Girona Spain

Girona Spain

Part of the magic of Girona Spain is how the colours change when the weather turns sour or the sun sets. Its pastels change hue with less impact and become even more subtle. It may feel odd that such a colourful city should photograph well in black and white yet it does. Cobble streets adds texture and geometry. A lovely city in the baking sun, refreshing rain, mid-day or sunset. Although it really comes alive with noise and bustle at dusk.

Girona Spain
Girona Spain

See Girona views, Catalonia, Spain

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Green Volcano in Spain

The Garrotxa region in the heartland of Catalonia has this walk around a volcano in Spain. There are many dormant volcanoes, but apart from the land relief, there are no volcanic tell-tales. It is so green and lush in vegetation with an interesting beech forrest that has thrived on the lava outflows and fertile soil.

Beech forrest reclaim lava flows
Beech forrest reclaim lava flows

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Rupit photographed in black and white

This is another medieval village located 100km north of Barcelona and lies 800m up on hills in Catalonia, Spain. You can visit 12th Century churches, old buildings as well as carefully arranged fields which hint to its working life. Nowadays its charm attracts many visitors. Usually I shoot in colour, but for a change here is Rupit photographed in black and white.

Rupit photographed in black and white
Rupit photographed in black and white

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Castellfollit de la Roca, Village on a Cliff

Castellfollit de la Roca exists from its peculiar geological spit of land with sheer cliff edges. The village sits on a basalt crag 50m high above the valley floor and 1km long. The crag was formed from a lava flow in this volcanic region and the surrounding land was eroded from the two nearby rivers Fluvia and Turonell. Like Besalú, the streets are dark and narrow, but ooze charm.

Castellfollit de la Roca
Castellfollit de la Roca

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Besalú

The medieval town of Besalú sits north of Girona. You approach over a grand romanesque bridge with huge doorways over the river Fluvia. It is a 12th century fortress with a strong jewish history. Side streets are very small and bend sharply unfriendly to motor vehicles and great to stroll through.

Gateway across Besalú bridge
Gateway across Besalú bridge

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Lake of Banyoles

In Spain’s north-east Banyoles is the capital of the county Pla de l’Estany. The lake of Banyoles was formed from a volcanic depression with a beautiful blue tone. Its crystal clear waters was the centre for rowing competitions in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics.

Lake of Banyoles
Lake of Banyoles

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Girona views, Catalonia, Spain

Girona Part One

Girona – northern Spain’s largest city lies 62 miles north of Barcelona. Its position has been fought over many times by the French just 40 miles to the north. Wilfred the Hairy the Count of Barcelona, incorporated it within Barcelona’s power in 878.

River Onyar towards Basilica De Sant Feliu_Girona
River Onyar towards Basilica De Sant Feliu

It is a beautiful City full of pastels, history, alcoves (or is it nooks and crannies), cathedrals. From the Catalan flags you can feel it is Catalan in spirit, rarely a Spanish flag in sight. Continue reading Girona views, Catalonia, Spain

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Tabart Ness

Tabart Ness is a small peninsula on the north-east coast of Scotland, between Golspie and Findhorn. It is a rolling spit that protrudes into the North Sea while dividing the Dornoch and Cromarty firths. While this lies between busy destinations it therefore offers a quiet pleasant off-route from the main A9 road with rolling farmed fields and Portmahomack village.

Tabart Ness Lighthouse at Portmahomack
Tabart Ness Lighthouse

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Duncansby Head Stacks

Duncansby Head stacks are on the most northerly point of the British mainland, a higher latitude than John’O’Groats. On this Summer’s day the mist was pouring from the land to the sea, unusually. Yet blue skies over the North Sea. Yet the stacks or pinnacles are so majestic and give a good sign of coastal erosion.

Duncansby Head Stacks with Thirle Door in the mist
Duncansby Head Stacks with Thirle Door in the mist

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Stirling in Ice and Snow

I took a short walk around Stirling in ice and snow. Overcast boring skies meant a focus on the buildings and streets. The icicles are interesting hanging at an angle from The Golden Lion Hotel, Stirling. You can see there has been a constant left-right wind blowing up King street meaning as the icicle forms, it grows at an angle.

The Golden Lion Hotel, Stirling
The Golden Lion Hotel, Stirling

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Tracing Family History in Old Photographs

I began to scan old Kodachrome colour film transparencies taken by my father. This post is about researching images with which you know nothing of where or when they were taken. I picked-up my magnifying glass, opened Google Chrome browser and travelled the world.

Finding a Place from a Photograph

The scanned photographs were found inside a Kodachrome box with “Honeymoon” handwritten on it. So I suspected these shots were from my parents honeymoon on the Spanish island of Majorca in 1957.

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